Educational Resources

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Raising Jewish Children

Yosef T. Abramowitz and Rabbi Susan Silverman, Jewish Family and Life: Traditions, Holidays, and Values for Today's Parents and Children. New York: Golden Books, 1997.
This book goes through the cycle of Jewish holidays and explains Jewish values on a variety of subjects. (recommended by Vicki from Ohio)

 

Anita Diamant, Bible Baby Names: Spritiual Choices from Judeo-Christian Tradition. Jewish Lights, 1996.
Biblican overview of 630 names, with an emphasis on names that are relatively common in American usage.




Anita Diamant, The New Jewish Baby Book: Names, Ceremonies, and Customs. New York: Jewish Lights Publishing, 2005
This book offers precise guidelines for celebrating initial and fundamental rites of passage. It devotes much space to Jewish names, both biblical and cultural in origin, and explains the religious traditions and/or significance involved in each.



Anita Diamant and Karen Kushner, How to be a Jewish Parent: A Practical Handbook For Family Life. New York: Schocken, 2000.
This book offers readers ways to infuse your home with Judaism. In addition, it highlights Jewish choices you can make during each stage of your children’s lives. It is a great way to learn about many Jewish rituals, customs, and options that may be unfamiliar.



Hayim Halevy Donin, To Raise a Jewish Child: A Guide for Parents. Basic Books, 1991.
Provides information on raising Jewish children for those familiar with the religion and newcomers to the faith.




Gail Anthony Greenberg, MitzvahChic: How to Host a Meaningful, Fun, Drop-Dead Gorgeous Bar or Bat Mitzvah. Fireside, 2006.
MitzvahChic is fun, refreshing, insightful and original. It is packed with ideas ranging from centerpieces to the video montage.




Wendy Mogel, The Blessing of a Skinned Knee: Using Jewish Teachings to Raise Self Reliant Children. New York: Penguin, 2001.
This book is a guide on how to raise children while giving them room to explore and make mistakes. Mogel’s advice is informed by historical Jewish texts and her experience as a therapist and as a mother.


Kerry Olitzky, Steven Rosman, and David P. Kasakove, When Your Jewish Child Asks Why: Answers for Tough Questions. Ktav Publishing House, 1993
This is a self-help book designed for concerned parents whose kids (five to nine) begin asking embarrassing or difficult questions regarding God, religion, Judaism in particular, and their Jewish identity



Jeffrey Salkin, Putting Got on the Guest List: How to Reclaim the Spritual Meaning of your Child's Bar or Bat Mitzvah. Jewish Light Publishing, 1996.
A useful text on infusing the Bar/Bat Mitzvah ceremony with greater spirituality, this book includes suggestions on how to include non-Jewish parents in the event.